The addiction crisis


#41

#42

Attention Calgary and Winnipeg folks.


#43

This is absolutely bullshit. This is the stigma we need to get rid of. It’s basically people saying “not in my backyard”.


#44

Temple University stepping up.


#45

Treatment rather than punishment in the workplace.

http://mynorthwest.com/1004320/employer-unique-solution-opioid-crisis/amp/#amp_tf=From%20%1%24s


#46

It’s not getting better.


#47

Families being ripped apart


#48

It is better to light a candle, than to curse the darkness.

I agree, 100%, the solution is us. Last month was “Missions Week” at my church, where many of the full-time missionaries sponsored by our church, and its individual members, come from all over the world to share their experiences. I was speaking with several who work here in the US, and asked them what the biggest challenges they face out in the field. To a person, they said “drug addiction”. They communicated that in this country, a land of plenty, “poverty” is a relative term. Many of those who are living in poverty are either addicted themselves, or drugs are impacting their lives.

One of my oldest friends, “MikeyEye” is a former addict, who is now a spirit-filled, ordained minister. He and I grew up around the corner from each other. We played little league baseball together. His younger sister was my Junior High girlfriend. We reconnected about 10 years ago, and his testimony about going from drug user, to drug dealer, to escaping the drug life, to becoming a professional poker player, and then finding Jesus and his ultimate calling, is POWERFUL. It breaks my heart to hear how so many of our mutual friends ended up being consumed by that life.

A couple of years ago, he was trying to help a heroin-addicted young woman. She made some false accusations against him, and he ended up in jail for 90 days, and was eventually cleared of all charges. I told “Pastor Mike” how sorry I was that he had to go through this. He said "Stevie…don’t be. I was exactly where God wanted me to be. I was inside, with people who really needed me, most who where there because of crimes committed related to their addictions. Many came to Christ, and now attend my church, and I have started a jail ministry. " Pastor Mike has the experience and the “creds” to really help these people…

and so does @Englishd,


#49

I am completely agree with you. Thanks for this thread. We need to help other


#50

A guy at my “backup” meeting was trying to get a meeting going at a prison here in the twin cities, they haven’t let him in yet but from what I hear he’s still pursuing it.

I pray that the general population will stop demonizing addicts. The stigma around addiction makes it so hard for people to pursue recovery (imo). We would rather vote for someone we don’t believe in than help an addict get better. It baffles me.

Thanks for the thread @Englishd.


#51

I’ve found that, for me, the best thing I can do is share my story with others. I’m not necessarily comfortable doing it, especially bc there’s a very real chance that it could effect my ability to get back into law (oh well…), but I don’t really see any thing better I can do. It helps that my current employer is okay with me being open about my recovery, but eventually there’s going to be some surprised people from my old career and my family when this stuff comes out lol.


#52

We need more programs and people like this.


#53

Dude, that is freakin awesome! I honestly wanted to cry reading it…those people get it :slightly_smiling_face:


#54

WTF


#55

Im assuming this is that spice u could smoke. That shyt aint no joke. People smoke it to pass piss test. big with people on probation. I smoked it before its horrible and nothing like pot


#56

I’ve smoked it a few times myself. It was horrible.


#57

I haven’t read the journal yet, but I’m curious


#58

#59

Rural communities taking action.


#60

@Bill_Phillips - tag your other mainenites.

https://www.pressherald.com/2018/07/20/our-view-maines-spotty-response-to-opioid-epidemic-isnt-working/