How do you approach personal privacy?

While masks are mentioned in this post, this is not a post for mask debate, please do not bring that into the comments for the sake of keeping this post live


I’m curious to know what other people’s views are on privacy. I’m a very private person in general and have had the opportunity to see the world move into the more public dynamic that we’re in today, so I find the topic utterly fascinating and really love knowing what approach others take and why.

Do you think that trying to maintain privacy in today’s world is worth it? After all, there are so many ways you can be identified. Does convenience play a role for you? Do you think age makes a difference in how people approach privacy?

I don’t think there is really a right or wrong answer here, except in what is right or wrong for each person specifically.

Interestingly enough, Privacy International tried to come out with a face mask that could possibly fool facial recognition software, since most facial recognition software is so advanced that you can be recognized easily with a mask on. While their attempt was so-so, I thought the project was interesting enough that I would post the link here.

Again, please keep the comments focused on privacy and not on if people should or should not wear masks.

1 Like

I am fairly unconcered with privacy. I’m not important enough for anyone to spy on anyway.

4 Likes

I am a very private person, and have learned not to take a side on most issues, as though applying Tradition Ten to one’s life. That said, beliefs do play out in other ways. Participation in the local economy, for example. Whom one chooses to employ, or to work for. Where one volunteers and makes charitable donations. We truly do shout from the housetops. Privacy in this day and age is nearly impossible, but you can choose what you volunteer. I don’t do social media, but I don’t obsess about other things I can’t control.
Edited TMI, and, for privacy! :scream::joy:

1 Like

THAT is the gift of time in the rooms! You didn’t have to write a damn book like I did just now! :joy:

2 Likes

You know, I’m not so sure time in the rooms is everything. I think some people are more blunt and to the point than others. That’s one of the things I appreciate about @Englishd , but also some people are unconcerned with it in general and it’s still pretty interesting.

Privacy is dwindling away, and I have a feeling that in a couple of decades we might lose all concept of it in general. I’ve always been very private, which stemmed from self-preservation as a child; so, like you, I’m not interested in posting a lot on social sites. I think I’m about as open on TS as I’ve ever been anywhere, which really isn’t much.

I’m aware of how the proliferation of cameras in the world makes it pretty pointless to try to hide while walking around, but I do pay for private email and calendar services, use browsers that are more privacy focused, and try to reign in who gets my data (including meta data), etc.

I’m not important enough to spy on, but that doesn’t mean I wouldn’t rather keep to myself and maybe not have my neighbors or coworkers be able to get random information about me. This has actually been extremely useful in the past.

On the astrology front, since you brought it up, my chart basically oozes with my need for privacy; which really sucks for a Leo. :wink:

2 Likes

I’m relatively concerned about my privacy. I don’t go all nuts about it, I’ll let the government have what it wants :slight_smile: I understand not all countries have trustworthy officials.

I try to be more mindful in the internet. I’m from a small country, a small town and have a name that probably no one else has so I’m easy to find. I haven’t abandoned Google yet but that day might come. I got rid of Facebook and all other social media bc their terms of use are shit. I’m not gonna argue about that, ppl are free to disagree :slightly_smiling_face:

3 Likes

I don’t really give a fuck. I think I’d be honoured if someone’s interested in me…

3 Likes

I worked in database marketing for many years (when AOL ruled and Mark Zuckerberg was in kindergarten)…well before internet algorithms exploded and effectively changed marketing as we knew it. The info we were able to gather on anyone even way back then was quite impressive, and I realized that privacy was pretty much an illusion at that point. My feelings haven’t changed on the topic. Once our phones became tracking and listening devices, even the illusion was gone.

6 Likes

This is exactly what someone with something to hide would say.

Keeping my eye on you, bucko!
eye on you

4 Likes

When I was using, privacy was always at the front of my mind.

I was very aware of everything that went on in my phone etc.

But now that I’m clean, I dont think about privacy the way that I once deeply did.

As for our future with privacy, its inevitable that in the not to far off future , our privacy will be deeply monitored , much much more than it already is.

For example, look at china. The rest of the world is in the process of leveling up to how there society is monitored with the social rating system ( I don’t know the specific name of it but that is close enough )

Black mirror next level type of infiltration etc.

My thoughts? You gotta go completely off grid living if your not comfortable with the advanced developments of all this. Its the only way to have privacy.

Or go live in a submarine at the bottom of the ocean undetected for the rest of your days :joy:

3 Likes

See, that kind of thing is more what I’m concerned about. I know the government tracks me, I know that FB has a file on me even though I don’t have one. But I’ve known some very petty and vindictive people, and there have been situations that the only thing that has saved me from the fate of some others, was that they could find nothing on me online.

2 Likes

A very interesting topic with some interesting takes. I take privacy seriously, certainly when in comes to online life. I haven’t had social media for about 10 years. I quite quickly tuned into what was happening with phones and FB etc. I actually deleted all my social media after spending a couple of months in China. The trip had a big impact on my understanding of how these things work and my opinions on the matter. Back then I was routinely called a ‘conspiracy theorist’ for talking about mobiles being tracking devices, used for data harvesting etc. Still get called that quite a bit tbh :upside_down_face:. And @apes2020 , I agree, we are totally heading towards a social credit system and it is very worrying. Like @SassyRocks says, if you had your eyes open you could see what was happening. I’m still amazed by how many people still don’t see it (or don’t care) :man_shrugging:. In recent years I have taken other steps. I no longer use Google as a search engine (although I do still use it in other ways but limit it as much as possible and ultimately would like to stop using it all together), don’t use Amazon, various other things. This is mostly privacy/morally driven. It is true that we are far beyond the point that you can maintain complete privacy online, but I still do what I can. I wont become apathetic about it.

This is important. We live in a time where it is increasingly common for people to lose jobs/friendships etc. For having different political/social beliefs to others or other seamingly inconsequential things. People take great delight in ‘cancelling’ people they don’t like. Infact, in certain circles it is encouraged. Therefore I think it is very wise to keep personal information offline where possible. Not to mention the threats that women in particular can face as a result of their information being online.

I find it a difficult topic to discuss without it getting political, and I appreciate I’m treading a fine line already, so I will leave it there (I have a lot more I could say tho).

3 Likes

Dosnt bother me thats why i dont have any nicknames im who i am keep on trucking

3 Likes

It seems like, increasingly, every topic can be viewed politically, which makes it hard to discuss things sometimes. I really feel like it is in the discussion that we find common ground.

I always call my Android phone my “tracking device”. :laughing: I rarely refer to it as my phone. I’m not a fan of being tracked, but I try to have a good sense of humor about it at the very least.

Honestly, I think this will make life increasingly more difficult for young people as we don’t give them a way out or a path to ‘forgiveness’. Too many stories of people having posted really dumb things when they were younger, then having it held against them today even though they’re older and more mature.

If nothing else, I think privacy for kids and teens should be taken more seriously in a lot of areas. Not sure if you heard about the Pearson data breach, but kids’ data is being gathered through all these schools using big tech products, but it’s not treated with the care it should and you get stuff like this. You also have kids posting so much information about themselves online, because they often don’t have a grasp on the value of privacy, that they could be pretty easy to find them if you really wanted to.

Obviously, that’s just my view on it, but I think that sometimes a little prevention can go a long way.

Feel free to PM me if you want to get into it more.

2 Likes