Astronomy, science, rockets, NASA, and all the space topics thread. FREE ALIEN QUIZ INSIDE! DON'T WAIT! ACT NOW!

Not sure how I missed this thread, my favourite topics, Brian Cox is my legend

2 Likes

Food on Mars!

5 Likes

The video wasn’t working when I pulled up the site. Do you know the basics of what they developed to make planting viable? I’m super interested in this topic. I’ve read books like John Carter of Mars, the Red Rising Series, watched The Martian (book in a list of things to read), and I love the Terraforming Mars tabletop board game.

3 Likes

CTV (another Canadian news source) did an article on Mike Dixon’s research into space food, maybe this one will work? It’s also newer, from 2021 (the other one was 2019)

2 Likes

It’s all part of the Deep Space Food Challenge, a partnership of the Canadian Space Agency and NASA:

2 Likes

Mike Dixon did a pretty detailed interview about the techniques they’ve been using, also some of the choices they’ve had to make regarding choice of plants and growth strategies:

There’s also a really interesting paper he was an author on for a 2009 symposium, paper title “MELiSSA: The European Project of a Closed Life Support System”, on page 3 (according to the printed page numbers) of the symposium proceedings, here:

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Sheila-Nathan/publication/233918527_Gene_expression_changes_in_space_flown_Caenorhabditis_elegans_exposed_to_a_long_period_of_microgravity/links/09e4150ced7be5c395000000/Gene-expression-changes-in-space-flown-Caenorhabditis-elegans-exposed-to-a-long-period-of-microgravity.pdf

The full list of all Mike Dixon’s research publications is available here, but be warned, most of it is technical and reports on specific lab findings, not so much about the outer space connections. There are some interesting ones though (like that report on the closed life support system, above, is from this list):

And if you’re interested in a little trip back in time, unrelated to Mike Dixon, this article about research performed on the Mir space station reports on plants grown through a full life cycle, from seed to mature plant to a new plant grown from the seeds of the first plant, all in space:

2 Likes